Cool music video by Wilkinson. I like how they took a different angle on a five year relationship through numerical figures. 

"Her" Film Review
After watching this film last night, I think Her is a beautiful sci-fi romantic masterpiece relevant to the digital age we live in now. Out of all the movies I’ve watched in the last few years, Her is one of the few that has affected me so deeply on so many levels including romance. This thought provoking film will challenge you not only on an emotional level but also on a philosophical and existential level. 
It’s a story about a recently divorced man who falls in love with his artificially intelligent computer operating system. Melancholy meditation on the way technology simultaneously facilitates and thwarts our basic need for human connection, with alarming hints of where our relationship with technology might be heading in a not so distant future. It shows us how technology connects everyone to the world but can also isolate us from legitimate, warm human contact.
As we’re developing countless ways of communication through new sorts of technology, we’re ironically separating ourselves from other people. How many people do you see sitting round a table in a restaurant absorbed into their phone screens instead of talking to one another? How many people do you see walking down the street with headphones in their ears avoiding any and all sorts of human contact? The world in ‘Her’ is the one we live in now but turned up a notch. People don’t need to make connections with other people because their shiny little gadgets are there instead. Hell, even the characters in their video games talk to them. 

It’s a depiction of an introverted population on a wider scale. That was the most interesting element of the film to me because I genuinely find the relationships people form with their pieces of technology fascinating, I think it’s scary. There’s also the “What makes us human” layer in the film in regards to Samantha the operating system, as she begins to learn more and more about the world and questions her own existence as a machine.

What makes Her so special are the questions it poses to the viewer. What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be in love? What is love? As I said before, Her’s world is unfamiliar but not distant. Take a plunge into the world and life of Theodore Twombly, and you’ll find yourself re-examining humanity and love.

The performances by Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore) and Scarlett Johansson (Samantha, voice of the IOS operating system) are brilliant, but the cinematography is even better. The film’s most remarkable aspect is creating such a believable atmosphere, and then shooting it to near perfection in Shanghai and Los Angeles. I think Jonze’s streak of unique and thoughtful story telling hits all the right notes. The film has a soft, warm feel to it and has a wonderfully bizarre, strangely relatable premise; it is a sleekly-designed film that is both a feast for the eyes and the ears.
I recommend this film to anyone who likes challenging and thought provoking films that leave you questioning life days after you’ve watched it. 
You can watch the trailer here "Her" Film Review
After watching this film last night, I think Her is a beautiful sci-fi romantic masterpiece relevant to the digital age we live in now. Out of all the movies I’ve watched in the last few years, Her is one of the few that has affected me so deeply on so many levels including romance. This thought provoking film will challenge you not only on an emotional level but also on a philosophical and existential level. 
It’s a story about a recently divorced man who falls in love with his artificially intelligent computer operating system. Melancholy meditation on the way technology simultaneously facilitates and thwarts our basic need for human connection, with alarming hints of where our relationship with technology might be heading in a not so distant future. It shows us how technology connects everyone to the world but can also isolate us from legitimate, warm human contact.
As we’re developing countless ways of communication through new sorts of technology, we’re ironically separating ourselves from other people. How many people do you see sitting round a table in a restaurant absorbed into their phone screens instead of talking to one another? How many people do you see walking down the street with headphones in their ears avoiding any and all sorts of human contact? The world in ‘Her’ is the one we live in now but turned up a notch. People don’t need to make connections with other people because their shiny little gadgets are there instead. Hell, even the characters in their video games talk to them. 

It’s a depiction of an introverted population on a wider scale. That was the most interesting element of the film to me because I genuinely find the relationships people form with their pieces of technology fascinating, I think it’s scary. There’s also the “What makes us human” layer in the film in regards to Samantha the operating system, as she begins to learn more and more about the world and questions her own existence as a machine.

What makes Her so special are the questions it poses to the viewer. What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be in love? What is love? As I said before, Her’s world is unfamiliar but not distant. Take a plunge into the world and life of Theodore Twombly, and you’ll find yourself re-examining humanity and love.

The performances by Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore) and Scarlett Johansson (Samantha, voice of the IOS operating system) are brilliant, but the cinematography is even better. The film’s most remarkable aspect is creating such a believable atmosphere, and then shooting it to near perfection in Shanghai and Los Angeles. I think Jonze’s streak of unique and thoughtful story telling hits all the right notes. The film has a soft, warm feel to it and has a wonderfully bizarre, strangely relatable premise; it is a sleekly-designed film that is both a feast for the eyes and the ears.
I recommend this film to anyone who likes challenging and thought provoking films that leave you questioning life days after you’ve watched it. 
You can watch the trailer here "Her" Film Review
After watching this film last night, I think Her is a beautiful sci-fi romantic masterpiece relevant to the digital age we live in now. Out of all the movies I’ve watched in the last few years, Her is one of the few that has affected me so deeply on so many levels including romance. This thought provoking film will challenge you not only on an emotional level but also on a philosophical and existential level. 
It’s a story about a recently divorced man who falls in love with his artificially intelligent computer operating system. Melancholy meditation on the way technology simultaneously facilitates and thwarts our basic need for human connection, with alarming hints of where our relationship with technology might be heading in a not so distant future. It shows us how technology connects everyone to the world but can also isolate us from legitimate, warm human contact.
As we’re developing countless ways of communication through new sorts of technology, we’re ironically separating ourselves from other people. How many people do you see sitting round a table in a restaurant absorbed into their phone screens instead of talking to one another? How many people do you see walking down the street with headphones in their ears avoiding any and all sorts of human contact? The world in ‘Her’ is the one we live in now but turned up a notch. People don’t need to make connections with other people because their shiny little gadgets are there instead. Hell, even the characters in their video games talk to them. 

It’s a depiction of an introverted population on a wider scale. That was the most interesting element of the film to me because I genuinely find the relationships people form with their pieces of technology fascinating, I think it’s scary. There’s also the “What makes us human” layer in the film in regards to Samantha the operating system, as she begins to learn more and more about the world and questions her own existence as a machine.

What makes Her so special are the questions it poses to the viewer. What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be in love? What is love? As I said before, Her’s world is unfamiliar but not distant. Take a plunge into the world and life of Theodore Twombly, and you’ll find yourself re-examining humanity and love.

The performances by Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore) and Scarlett Johansson (Samantha, voice of the IOS operating system) are brilliant, but the cinematography is even better. The film’s most remarkable aspect is creating such a believable atmosphere, and then shooting it to near perfection in Shanghai and Los Angeles. I think Jonze’s streak of unique and thoughtful story telling hits all the right notes. The film has a soft, warm feel to it and has a wonderfully bizarre, strangely relatable premise; it is a sleekly-designed film that is both a feast for the eyes and the ears.
I recommend this film to anyone who likes challenging and thought provoking films that leave you questioning life days after you’ve watched it. 
You can watch the trailer here "Her" Film Review
After watching this film last night, I think Her is a beautiful sci-fi romantic masterpiece relevant to the digital age we live in now. Out of all the movies I’ve watched in the last few years, Her is one of the few that has affected me so deeply on so many levels including romance. This thought provoking film will challenge you not only on an emotional level but also on a philosophical and existential level. 
It’s a story about a recently divorced man who falls in love with his artificially intelligent computer operating system. Melancholy meditation on the way technology simultaneously facilitates and thwarts our basic need for human connection, with alarming hints of where our relationship with technology might be heading in a not so distant future. It shows us how technology connects everyone to the world but can also isolate us from legitimate, warm human contact.
As we’re developing countless ways of communication through new sorts of technology, we’re ironically separating ourselves from other people. How many people do you see sitting round a table in a restaurant absorbed into their phone screens instead of talking to one another? How many people do you see walking down the street with headphones in their ears avoiding any and all sorts of human contact? The world in ‘Her’ is the one we live in now but turned up a notch. People don’t need to make connections with other people because their shiny little gadgets are there instead. Hell, even the characters in their video games talk to them. 

It’s a depiction of an introverted population on a wider scale. That was the most interesting element of the film to me because I genuinely find the relationships people form with their pieces of technology fascinating, I think it’s scary. There’s also the “What makes us human” layer in the film in regards to Samantha the operating system, as she begins to learn more and more about the world and questions her own existence as a machine.

What makes Her so special are the questions it poses to the viewer. What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be in love? What is love? As I said before, Her’s world is unfamiliar but not distant. Take a plunge into the world and life of Theodore Twombly, and you’ll find yourself re-examining humanity and love.

The performances by Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore) and Scarlett Johansson (Samantha, voice of the IOS operating system) are brilliant, but the cinematography is even better. The film’s most remarkable aspect is creating such a believable atmosphere, and then shooting it to near perfection in Shanghai and Los Angeles. I think Jonze’s streak of unique and thoughtful story telling hits all the right notes. The film has a soft, warm feel to it and has a wonderfully bizarre, strangely relatable premise; it is a sleekly-designed film that is both a feast for the eyes and the ears.
I recommend this film to anyone who likes challenging and thought provoking films that leave you questioning life days after you’ve watched it. 
You can watch the trailer here "Her" Film Review
After watching this film last night, I think Her is a beautiful sci-fi romantic masterpiece relevant to the digital age we live in now. Out of all the movies I’ve watched in the last few years, Her is one of the few that has affected me so deeply on so many levels including romance. This thought provoking film will challenge you not only on an emotional level but also on a philosophical and existential level. 
It’s a story about a recently divorced man who falls in love with his artificially intelligent computer operating system. Melancholy meditation on the way technology simultaneously facilitates and thwarts our basic need for human connection, with alarming hints of where our relationship with technology might be heading in a not so distant future. It shows us how technology connects everyone to the world but can also isolate us from legitimate, warm human contact.
As we’re developing countless ways of communication through new sorts of technology, we’re ironically separating ourselves from other people. How many people do you see sitting round a table in a restaurant absorbed into their phone screens instead of talking to one another? How many people do you see walking down the street with headphones in their ears avoiding any and all sorts of human contact? The world in ‘Her’ is the one we live in now but turned up a notch. People don’t need to make connections with other people because their shiny little gadgets are there instead. Hell, even the characters in their video games talk to them. 

It’s a depiction of an introverted population on a wider scale. That was the most interesting element of the film to me because I genuinely find the relationships people form with their pieces of technology fascinating, I think it’s scary. There’s also the “What makes us human” layer in the film in regards to Samantha the operating system, as she begins to learn more and more about the world and questions her own existence as a machine.

What makes Her so special are the questions it poses to the viewer. What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be in love? What is love? As I said before, Her’s world is unfamiliar but not distant. Take a plunge into the world and life of Theodore Twombly, and you’ll find yourself re-examining humanity and love.

The performances by Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore) and Scarlett Johansson (Samantha, voice of the IOS operating system) are brilliant, but the cinematography is even better. The film’s most remarkable aspect is creating such a believable atmosphere, and then shooting it to near perfection in Shanghai and Los Angeles. I think Jonze’s streak of unique and thoughtful story telling hits all the right notes. The film has a soft, warm feel to it and has a wonderfully bizarre, strangely relatable premise; it is a sleekly-designed film that is both a feast for the eyes and the ears.
I recommend this film to anyone who likes challenging and thought provoking films that leave you questioning life days after you’ve watched it. 
You can watch the trailer here

"Her" Film Review

After watching this film last night, I think Her is a beautiful sci-fi romantic masterpiece relevant to the digital age we live in now. Out of all the movies I’ve watched in the last few years, Her is one of the few that has affected me so deeply on so many levels including romance. This thought provoking film will challenge you not only on an emotional level but also on a philosophical and existential level. 

It’s a story about a recently divorced man who falls in love with his artificially intelligent computer operating system. Melancholy meditation on the way technology simultaneously facilitates and thwarts our basic need for human connection, with alarming hints of where our relationship with technology might be heading in a not so distant future. It shows us how technology connects everyone to the world but can also isolate us from legitimate, warm human contact.

As we’re developing countless ways of communication through new sorts of technology, we’re ironically separating ourselves from other people. How many people do you see sitting round a table in a restaurant absorbed into their phone screens instead of talking to one another? How many people do you see walking down the street with headphones in their ears avoiding any and all sorts of human contact? The world in ‘Her’ is the one we live in now but turned up a notch. People don’t need to make connections with other people because their shiny little gadgets are there instead. Hell, even the characters in their video games talk to them. 

It’s a depiction of an introverted population on a wider scale. That was the most interesting element of the film to me because I genuinely find the relationships people form with their pieces of technology fascinating, I think it’s scary. There’s also the “What makes us human” layer in the film in regards to Samantha the operating system, as she begins to learn more and more about the world and questions her own existence as a machine.

What makes Her so special are the questions it poses to the viewer. What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be in love? What is love? As I said before, Her’s world is unfamiliar but not distant. Take a plunge into the world and life of Theodore Twombly, and you’ll find yourself re-examining humanity and love.

The performances by Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore) and Scarlett Johansson (Samantha, voice of the IOS operating system) are brilliant, but the cinematography is even better. The film’s most remarkable aspect is creating such a believable atmosphere, and then shooting it to near perfection in Shanghai and Los Angeles. I think Jonze’s streak of unique and thoughtful story telling hits all the right notes. The film has a soft, warm feel to it and has a wonderfully bizarre, strangely relatable premise; it is a sleekly-designed film that is both a feast for the eyes and the ears.

I recommend this film to anyone who likes challenging and thought provoking films that leave you questioning life days after you’ve watched it. 

You can watch the trailer here

Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22
Agencies we delivered sweets to:
1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern

7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young

Agencies that replied:


1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern

6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct

Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:

1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative

Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell
2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth
4. Instruct: John Owens
5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 
6. Barney Ibbotson: 
7. Magnetic North: Tom
We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 
So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 
Responses in total: 22

Agencies we delivered sweets to:

1. Love Creative
2. Retrofuzz
3.The Neighbourhood
4. Design by Day
5. Dinosaur
6.Creative Concern
7. Design by Music
8. Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
9.OWT Creative
10. Creative Spark
11. Pixel 8
12. Havas Lynx
13. Raw Design Studio
14.Glorious Creative
15. Made by Shape
16. Barney Ibbotson
17. Instruct
18. Young
Agencies that replied:
1. Retrofuzz
2. The Neighbourhood
3. Design by Day
4. Dinosaur
5. Creative Concern
6.Magnetic North Interactive Ltd
7.OWT Creative
8.Creative Spark
9. Havas Lynx
10. Raw Design Studio
11. Made by Shape
12. Barney Ibbotson
13. Instruct
Personal Interviews we’ve had so far:
1. Retrofuzz
2. Design by Day
3. Owt Creative
Meetings in the next few weeks (Easter):

1. Creative Spark: James O’Connell

2. Dinosaur: Stuart

3. Creative Concern : Elizabeth

4. Instruct: John Owens

5. Havas Lynx: Sophie 

6. Barney Ibbotson: 

7. Magnetic North: Tom

We sent emails with questionnaires to 25 agencies and got 12 responses back. 

So altogether with sweets delivered and emails we sent, it was about 43 agencies. 

Responses in total: 22

My Logo and CV My Logo and CV My Logo and CV My Logo and CV

My Logo and CV

My personal website so far My personal website so far My personal website so far
Design By Day Interview with Angela Roche and Sami France last week:
Questions:

1. Was their a particular moment in your life that made you realise that you wanted to be a designer?

Angela: In 1997. I had just started university and was studying business. A friend had some flyers on his bedroom wall, and I realised there was degree where you can design flyers. 

Sami: For me, it was a process of elimination. I just thought about what other things I didn’t like doing, and what I did enjoy doing. 


2. I understand that the internet is a source of inspiration for a lot of people. How do you keep your ideas fresh and original without doing the same thing everyone else is doing? What sources do you go to?

Angela & Sami: We sit around the table, do some brainstorming, word association, and then we usually make Pinterest/Mood boards that represent the brand that we are designing the brief for. 

4. How do you switch off? What do you do to avoid burning out?

Angela: I tried meditation, but I generally never switch off.

5. What keeps you motivated? Are there any other designers that inspire you? 



Angela: I’d say generally people around me. I get loads of influences on Pinterest. Design by day actually turned five this month.

Rob: Kate Moross. I just love everything she has done and achieved.

6. Are there any ethics that your company stands by in particular when it comes to accepting projects/clients?

Angela & Sami: We really like to work for non-profit organisations. We don’t do work for companies like pay day loans, botox companies, and cigarette companies. I think the craziest project we’ve done was a website for a shotgun company but it was more like target shooting, not real guns. 

7. How do you generally deal with a difficult client? Is there anything that would stop you from accepting a brief from a client?

Angela: Sometimes we just get to a point where the relationship isn’t salvageable. Sometimes the client, wants to change the process of how the agency works, so there’s been a few occasions where we just pull out because the client keeps on wanting never ending changes. 

Sami: I’d say the most difficult clients are the ones that have never worked with agencies before. If you want a client to go for your idea, make them think its their idea, define their goals, and say “I don’t think this is going to meet your goals.” Sometimes clients will try and bring in their personal taste. For example, we were designing a leaflet and website for the NHS and the client forced us to put in red just because they support Manchester United, regardless if it was not part of the brand colour guidelines.

Angela: To keep clients happy, we have now implemented a rule where every Monday, we send emails to clients regardless if we have gotten a reply from them or not. Just a quick call or quick email to let them know what we are up to, and how the project is going. 

8. If you had a motto for your company, what would it be?


Angela: Work hard and drink loads.

Ethos: Make good work, keep clients happy, and make sure you’re enjoying it.

 9. What advice would you give to your 20 year old self or when you where starting out if you could go back in time? 


Angela: Try and get into the habit of having a good work-life balance.

Sami: Don’t think that just because you have a graphic design degree, you have to be a graphic designer. There’s a lot of transferable skills you acquire in your degree like solving problems, thinking analytically that are valuable in other professions.


10. What’s the most fun/exciting brief you’ve ever been presented?

Angela & Sami: I think it would have to be the Great British Butcher (Manchester Flavours Company). He was a very smart client who had experiences with bigger agencies, and the brief was very open to interpretation. He gave us all the information we needed and he asked the right questions. 


11. What do you look for in a designer to join your studio?

Angela:  Someone who can have a good laugh about themselves and doesn’t take themselves to seriously. No knobs are allowed in here! (Laughter) Don’t be a knob, and be nice to everyone.


12. What’s the worst brief you’ve done?

Sami: Sometimes they are really boring briefs, but if the client is nice, then it makes the project so much better. If you get a great brief, but the client is rubbish, it makes the experience awful. I once designed a very complex book for a client with illustrations in it, and after all that work, she made the printers change it. What a horrible woman. In other words, “The client always makes the project.”


13. Do you have any good advice for students or designers that are starting out?

Angela & Sami:

-Show your face
-Pick up the phone
-Tailor your portfolio to the studio you are applying for.
-Sending a PDF is good, but sometimes tactile is nicer (print stuff).
-If you are going to send work through the mail, send something useful that we can keep.
-Try and collaborate as much as possible. 
-Try and get as much feedback as you can.





Conclusion:


Sami: I want to change the NHS, slowly but surely. 

Design By Day Interview with Angela Roche and Sami France last week:
Questions:

1. Was their a particular moment in your life that made you realise that you wanted to be a designer?

Angela: In 1997. I had just started university and was studying business. A friend had some flyers on his bedroom wall, and I realised there was degree where you can design flyers. 

Sami: For me, it was a process of elimination. I just thought about what other things I didn’t like doing, and what I did enjoy doing. 


2. I understand that the internet is a source of inspiration for a lot of people. How do you keep your ideas fresh and original without doing the same thing everyone else is doing? What sources do you go to?

Angela & Sami: We sit around the table, do some brainstorming, word association, and then we usually make Pinterest/Mood boards that represent the brand that we are designing the brief for. 

4. How do you switch off? What do you do to avoid burning out?

Angela: I tried meditation, but I generally never switch off.

5. What keeps you motivated? Are there any other designers that inspire you? 



Angela: I’d say generally people around me. I get loads of influences on Pinterest. Design by day actually turned five this month.

Rob: Kate Moross. I just love everything she has done and achieved.

6. Are there any ethics that your company stands by in particular when it comes to accepting projects/clients?

Angela & Sami: We really like to work for non-profit organisations. We don’t do work for companies like pay day loans, botox companies, and cigarette companies. I think the craziest project we’ve done was a website for a shotgun company but it was more like target shooting, not real guns. 

7. How do you generally deal with a difficult client? Is there anything that would stop you from accepting a brief from a client?

Angela: Sometimes we just get to a point where the relationship isn’t salvageable. Sometimes the client, wants to change the process of how the agency works, so there’s been a few occasions where we just pull out because the client keeps on wanting never ending changes. 

Sami: I’d say the most difficult clients are the ones that have never worked with agencies before. If you want a client to go for your idea, make them think its their idea, define their goals, and say “I don’t think this is going to meet your goals.” Sometimes clients will try and bring in their personal taste. For example, we were designing a leaflet and website for the NHS and the client forced us to put in red just because they support Manchester United, regardless if it was not part of the brand colour guidelines.

Angela: To keep clients happy, we have now implemented a rule where every Monday, we send emails to clients regardless if we have gotten a reply from them or not. Just a quick call or quick email to let them know what we are up to, and how the project is going. 

8. If you had a motto for your company, what would it be?


Angela: Work hard and drink loads.

Ethos: Make good work, keep clients happy, and make sure you’re enjoying it.

 9. What advice would you give to your 20 year old self or when you where starting out if you could go back in time? 


Angela: Try and get into the habit of having a good work-life balance.

Sami: Don’t think that just because you have a graphic design degree, you have to be a graphic designer. There’s a lot of transferable skills you acquire in your degree like solving problems, thinking analytically that are valuable in other professions.


10. What’s the most fun/exciting brief you’ve ever been presented?

Angela & Sami: I think it would have to be the Great British Butcher (Manchester Flavours Company). He was a very smart client who had experiences with bigger agencies, and the brief was very open to interpretation. He gave us all the information we needed and he asked the right questions. 


11. What do you look for in a designer to join your studio?

Angela:  Someone who can have a good laugh about themselves and doesn’t take themselves to seriously. No knobs are allowed in here! (Laughter) Don’t be a knob, and be nice to everyone.


12. What’s the worst brief you’ve done?

Sami: Sometimes they are really boring briefs, but if the client is nice, then it makes the project so much better. If you get a great brief, but the client is rubbish, it makes the experience awful. I once designed a very complex book for a client with illustrations in it, and after all that work, she made the printers change it. What a horrible woman. In other words, “The client always makes the project.”


13. Do you have any good advice for students or designers that are starting out?

Angela & Sami:

-Show your face
-Pick up the phone
-Tailor your portfolio to the studio you are applying for.
-Sending a PDF is good, but sometimes tactile is nicer (print stuff).
-If you are going to send work through the mail, send something useful that we can keep.
-Try and collaborate as much as possible. 
-Try and get as much feedback as you can.





Conclusion:


Sami: I want to change the NHS, slowly but surely. 

Design By Day Interview with Angela Roche and Sami France last week:

Questions:
1. Was their a particular moment in your life that made you realise that you wanted to be a designer?
Angela: In 1997. I had just started university and was studying business. A friend had some flyers on his bedroom wall, and I realised there was degree where you can design flyers. 
Sami: For me, it was a process of elimination. I just thought about what other things I didn’t like doing, and what I did enjoy doing. 
2. I understand that the internet is a source of inspiration for a lot of people. How do you keep your ideas fresh and original without doing the same thing everyone else is doing? What sources do you go to?
Angela & Sami: We sit around the table, do some brainstorming, word association, and then we usually make Pinterest/Mood boards that represent the brand that we are designing the brief for. 
4. How do you switch off? What do you do to avoid burning out?
Angela: I tried meditation, but I generally never switch off.
5. What keeps you motivated? Are there any other designers that inspire you? 
Angela: I’d say generally people around me. I get loads of influences on Pinterest. Design by day actually turned five this month.
Rob: Kate Moross. I just love everything she has done and achieved.
6. Are there any ethics that your company stands by in particular when it comes to accepting projects/clients?
Angela & Sami: We really like to work for non-profit organisations. We don’t do work for companies like pay day loans, botox companies, and cigarette companies. I think the craziest project we’ve done was a website for a shotgun company but it was more like target shooting, not real guns. 
7. How do you generally deal with a difficult client? Is there anything that would stop you from accepting a brief from a client?
Angela: Sometimes we just get to a point where the relationship isn’t salvageable. Sometimes the client, wants to change the process of how the agency works, so there’s been a few occasions where we just pull out because the client keeps on wanting never ending changes. 
Sami: I’d say the most difficult clients are the ones that have never worked with agencies before. If you want a client to go for your idea, make them think its their idea, define their goals, and say “I don’t think this is going to meet your goals.” Sometimes clients will try and bring in their personal taste. For example, we were designing a leaflet and website for the NHS and the client forced us to put in red just because they support Manchester United, regardless if it was not part of the brand colour guidelines.
Angela: To keep clients happy, we have now implemented a rule where every Monday, we send emails to clients regardless if we have gotten a reply from them or not. Just a quick call or quick email to let them know what we are up to, and how the project is going. 
8. If you had a motto for your company, what would it be?
Angela: Work hard and drink loads.
Ethos: Make good work, keep clients happy, and make sure you’re enjoying it.
 9. What advice would you give to your 20 year old self or when you where starting out if you could go back in time? 
Angela: Try and get into the habit of having a good work-life balance.
Sami: Don’t think that just because you have a graphic design degree, you have to be a graphic designer. There’s a lot of transferable skills you acquire in your degree like solving problems, thinking analytically that are valuable in other professions.
10. What’s the most fun/exciting brief you’ve ever been presented?
Angela & Sami: I think it would have to be the Great British Butcher (Manchester Flavours Company). He was a very smart client who had experiences with bigger agencies, and the brief was very open to interpretation. He gave us all the information we needed and he asked the right questions. 
11. What do you look for in a designer to join your studio?
Angela:  Someone who can have a good laugh about themselves and doesn’t take themselves to seriously. No knobs are allowed in here! (Laughter) Don’t be a knob, and be nice to everyone.
12. What’s the worst brief you’ve done?
Sami: Sometimes they are really boring briefs, but if the client is nice, then it makes the project so much better. If you get a great brief, but the client is rubbish, it makes the experience awful. I once designed a very complex book for a client with illustrations in it, and after all that work, she made the printers change it. What a horrible woman. In other words, “The client always makes the project.”
13. Do you have any good advice for students or designers that are starting out?
Angela & Sami:
-Show your face
-Pick up the phone
-Tailor your portfolio to the studio you are applying for.
-Sending a PDF is good, but sometimes tactile is nicer (print stuff).
-If you are going to send work through the mail, send something useful that we can keep.
-Try and collaborate as much as possible. 
-Try and get as much feedback as you can.
Conclusion:
Sami: I want to change the NHS, slowly but surely. 
The Liars Club
Last week I was asked by Gary to help out and photograph the 3rd years portfolio review night at the Liars Club. It was a great night full of talent and loads of senior designers reviewing 3rd years portfolios. I also got to meet the Creative Concern team, which was awesome because they are an agency I really like.  The Liars Club
Last week I was asked by Gary to help out and photograph the 3rd years portfolio review night at the Liars Club. It was a great night full of talent and loads of senior designers reviewing 3rd years portfolios. I also got to meet the Creative Concern team, which was awesome because they are an agency I really like. 

The Liars Club

Last week I was asked by Gary to help out and photograph the 3rd years portfolio review night at the Liars Club. It was a great night full of talent and loads of senior designers reviewing 3rd years portfolios. I also got to meet the Creative Concern team, which was awesome because they are an agency I really like. 

Personal Website:
I managed to code most of the basic bits of my website using HTML 5 on Dreamweaver, so links are working, and four of the pages as well. Followed Jules video tutorials on Blackboard and also managed to find some helpful tutorials on Youtube. I am having problems with CSS though because I don’t know how to use div’s and how to stylise, use margins, padding, etc. 
I am going to ask some course mates tomorrow at uni to just help me out a tiny bit on the styling part, as in tell me how to do it.  Personal Website:
I managed to code most of the basic bits of my website using HTML 5 on Dreamweaver, so links are working, and four of the pages as well. Followed Jules video tutorials on Blackboard and also managed to find some helpful tutorials on Youtube. I am having problems with CSS though because I don’t know how to use div’s and how to stylise, use margins, padding, etc. 
I am going to ask some course mates tomorrow at uni to just help me out a tiny bit on the styling part, as in tell me how to do it.  Personal Website:
I managed to code most of the basic bits of my website using HTML 5 on Dreamweaver, so links are working, and four of the pages as well. Followed Jules video tutorials on Blackboard and also managed to find some helpful tutorials on Youtube. I am having problems with CSS though because I don’t know how to use div’s and how to stylise, use margins, padding, etc. 
I am going to ask some course mates tomorrow at uni to just help me out a tiny bit on the styling part, as in tell me how to do it.  Personal Website:
I managed to code most of the basic bits of my website using HTML 5 on Dreamweaver, so links are working, and four of the pages as well. Followed Jules video tutorials on Blackboard and also managed to find some helpful tutorials on Youtube. I am having problems with CSS though because I don’t know how to use div’s and how to stylise, use margins, padding, etc. 
I am going to ask some course mates tomorrow at uni to just help me out a tiny bit on the styling part, as in tell me how to do it. 

Personal Website:

I managed to code most of the basic bits of my website using HTML 5 on Dreamweaver, so links are working, and four of the pages as well. Followed Jules video tutorials on Blackboard and also managed to find some helpful tutorials on Youtube. I am having problems with CSS though because I don’t know how to use div’s and how to stylise, use margins, padding, etc. 

I am going to ask some course mates tomorrow at uni to just help me out a tiny bit on the styling part, as in tell me how to do it. 

Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention.  Lasercutting:
Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 
Creative Spark Competition:
After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention. 

Lasercutting:

Today I had a great laser cutting session with Kostas. He was very helpful and showed me how to set up my Adobe Illustrator file so its ready to send to the laser cutter. I tested laser cutting my logo on perspex and mdf as you can see in the pictures above. I wanted to see what the different textures would look like before I try it on a bigger project like my self-promo menu cards. I think engraving wood would be great on the laser cutter. You can get some really beautiful details with it. 

Creative Spark Competition:

After the laser-cutting session, James O’Connell from Creative Spark came to Salford to show us some of his work and to tell us more about a student competition with Click4Jobs.com. All you have to do is make an illustration that will be wrapped around the whole bus, and will grab the general public’s attention. 

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:
After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.
Mono Printing:

Lino printing:

After having an introductory one-to-one Lino printing session with Jake a few weeks ago, I decided to make some more prints in the print room at university. I still haven’t mastered it yet, (mainly the inking bit) but practice makes perfect so yeah I will have a go again when I come back from my Easter holidays. I really enjoy making prints, and getting my hands dirty, so I’m glad I’ve been learning because I definitely want to keep on doing this.

Mono Printing: